Did you get your money's worth from Congress last week?

Money's Worth | April 4, 2011

Congress was back in session this week, but couldn’t come to agreement on a long-term continuing resolution (CR) to keep the government funded through the end of fiscal year 2011. (The House did pass a “largely symbolic” measure that says if the Senate does not pass a long-term CR by April 6 the version the House passed would become law.)

So what did lawmakers accomplish this week? Check for details below and let us know if you got your money’s worth from Congress this week.

What you paid

Last week taxpayers spent roughly $107.8 million on Congress.

Salaries of Members of Congress and their allowances/week:

Speaker of the House: $223,500/52 = $4,299
House and Senate Majority and Minority Leaders: ($193,400/52) x 4 = $14,877
Other Representatives and Senators: ($174,000/52) x 530 = $1,773,462

Average budget for Members of Congress: ($1,600,000/52) x 535 = $16,461,538

Non-salary money allocated for Congress: $4.656 billion/52 = $89,538,462

What you got

The House passed five bills or resolutions that would cost taxpayers more than $72 billion.

H R 658, FAA Reauthorization and Reform Act of 2011. COST: $72.3 billion over 5 years

H R 872, To amend the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act and the Federal Water Pollution Control Act to clarify Congressional intent regarding the regulation of the use of pesticides in or near navigable waters. COST: “No significant impact.”

H R 471, Scholarships for Opportunity and Results Act. COST: $300 million over 5 years

H R 839, The HAMP Termination Act of 2011. SAVINGS: $1.4 billion over 10 years

The Senate held one vote, on the nomination of Mae A. D’Agostino, of New York, to be U.S. District Judge.

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3 Responses to Did you get your money's worth from Congress last week?

  1. RichPersen says:

    The biggest problem here is that unlike all other governmental employees, our elected officials do not have job requirements, training, and any accountability beyond the polls to keep them in their jobs. It’s ridiculous that we should continue on this path. Why not at LEAST have some minimum requirements and performance grades for their service?

  2. RichPersen says:

    The biggest problem here is that unlike all other governmental employees, our elected officials do not have job requirements, training, and any accountability beyond the polls to keep them in their jobs. It’s ridiculous that we should continue on this path. Why not at LEAST have some minimum requirements and performance grades for their service?

  3. RichPersen says:

    The biggest problem here is that unlike all other governmental employees, our elected officials do not have job requirements, training, and any accountability beyond the polls to keep them in their jobs. It’s ridiculous that we should continue on this path. Why not at LEAST have some minimum requirements and performance grades for their service?

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