Take Notice: news on the economy and spending

March 2, 2010

Washington Post:

Deal on consumer agency nears: Sens. Dodd and Corker are close to agreement on proposing regulator housed inside Federal Reserve.

President sells stimulus package in Ga.: To hear President Obama tell it, his plans for reshaping the nation’s economy are aimed at helping people like Ray Gaster, whose small chain of lumberyards here has been walloped by the recession.

New York Times:

Hoyer Urges Bipartisanship on Debt: Representative Steny H. Hoyer calls on both parties to come together to tackle tough fiscal questions.

Biden to Labor Leaders: Things Could Be Worse: The vice president counsels patience on creating jobs, and continues to say that things could’ve been a lot worse without the stimulus package.

Wall Street Journal:

Staffing Woes Slow Jobs Program: As Washington debates new job-creation initiatives, one federal program already in place is hitting obstacles to boosting employment—in part because the program itself could use some more staffers.

Lawmakers Keep Change From Trips: When lawmakers travel overseas on official business they are given up to $250 a day to cover meals and expenses. Congressional rules say they must return any leftover cash to the government. They usually don’t.

Firms Map Routes to Recovery: Corporate America is emerging from the worst downturn since the Great Depression smaller and thriftier. Wrenching layoffs and plant closures have left them more financially conservative and wary of risk, affecting their plans for recovery.

USA Today:

Postal Service seeks 5-day delivery: The U.S. Postal Service will move this month toward reducing mail delivery from six days a week to five, a change Postmaster General John Potter has said is critical to reducing its massive debt.

Stalemate holding up jobless benefits: Hundreds of thousands of out-of-work Americans will begin losing unemployment and health benefits this week as a one-man filibuster in the Senate continued to block a measure to extend those and other programs for one month.

Obama balances between jobs and health care: Today, jobs; tomorrow, health care. These days, President Obama is trying to maintain a delicate political balance between two top domestic priorities, his health care plan and his efforts to revive the slumping jobs market.

Politico:

House Dems short on jobs bill votes: The legislation is facing opposition from some Blue Dogs and members of the CBC.

The Hill:

Hoyer: Raising taxes a realistic option: Tax increases may be necessary to rein in $12 trillion in federal debt, House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer said Monday.

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3 Responses to Take Notice: news on the economy and spending

  1. insurance says:

    The government was “trapped” only because it refused to cut spending during the Depression. Today, government feels equally “trapped” because politicians have a very strong preference for buying votes with borrowed dollars. The entire Western world is now discovering that it is not possible to borrow ad infinitum; eventually the piper demands to be paid. A sound currency would make it much more difficult for politicians to consign our children and grandchildren to debt slavery; such constraints are not a bad thing, – unless one values the ease of politicians over that of our children.

  2. insurance says:

    The government was “trapped” only because it refused to cut spending during the Depression. Today, government feels equally “trapped” because politicians have a very strong preference for buying votes with borrowed dollars. The entire Western world is now discovering that it is not possible to borrow ad infinitum; eventually the piper demands to be paid. A sound currency would make it much more difficult for politicians to consign our children and grandchildren to debt slavery; such constraints are not a bad thing, – unless one values the ease of politicians over that of our children.

  3. insurance says:

    The government was “trapped” only because it refused to cut spending during the Depression. Today, government feels equally “trapped” because politicians have a very strong preference for buying votes with borrowed dollars. The entire Western world is now discovering that it is not possible to borrow ad infinitum; eventually the piper demands to be paid. A sound currency would make it much more difficult for politicians to consign our children and grandchildren to debt slavery; such constraints are not a bad thing, – unless one values the ease of politicians over that of our children.

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