New CBO Score Confirms Americans Can’t Afford the New Health Care Law

Media Contact: Public Notice Press Office | 571.970.6490

NEW CBO SCORE CONFIRMS AMERICANS CAN’T AFFORD THE NEW HEALTH CARE LAW

Arlington, Va.—The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) today released an updated score showing that repealing the Affordable Care Act would cut $890 billion of new spending.  While the CBO predicts the law will reduce the deficit by $109 billion over the next ten years because of the new taxes contained in the bill, a majority of the spending won’t begin for another two years.  This accounting method artificially reduces the cost estimates by measuring eight years of actual spending over a 10-year period of new taxes.

Gretchen Hamel, executive director of Public Notice, commented on the CBO’s new score of the Affordable Care Act:

“Today’s report from the CBO confirms what we already knew: this new health care law is way too expensive and Americans simply can’t afford it. While our health care system is in dire need of real reform, adding $890 billion to our nearly $16 trillion national debt only to be left with higher costs, fewer choices and reduced quality of care isn’t the answer.

Furthermore, with the majority of new spending not starting for another two years, the CBO’s cost projection over a ten year period to 2022 is artificially low.  Just because Americans are getting the first two months rent-free doesn’t mean they can afford to renew year after year when fees spike.

What the American people deserve is a patient-centered plan that addresses the major drivers of our debt and entitlements, while lowering costs for families and businesses—not a massive tax hike to fund government overreach into our daily health care decisions that clearly does more harm than good.”

To schedule an interview with Gretchen Hamel, contact the Public Notice Press Office at 571.970. 6490.

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